Scope and Sequence

In this section of the curriculum website you will find some information about how to scope and sequence learning and why developing a scope and sequence is important.

What is the difference between scope and sequence?

Is the Framework a scope and sequence?

What do you need to do to get started?

What do you do next?

What will you teach, when will you teach it?

What does a curriculum map look like?

Where can I find templates and examples of scope and sequences?

 

What is the difference between scope and sequence?

scope

The breadth and depth of content to be covered in a curriculum at any one time (e.g. week, term, year, over a student’s school life).All that you do in a given period.
sequence The order in which content is presented to learners over time. The order in which you do it.
Together a scope and sequence of learning bring order to the delivery of content, supporting the maximising of student learning and offering sustained opportunities for learning. Without a considered scope and sequence there is the risk of ad hoc content delivery and the missing of significant learning.

Is the Framework a scope and sequence?

The new curriculum framework is a scope of learning. You might want to add to that scope in terms of the worthwhile learning your school wishes to include.

The framework also offers a sequence of learning developed across four bands of development.

The task of schools is to decide which part of the scope of learning happens at what point within a band of development, i.e. what content is for what year level or group of students. Teachers must decide the sequence of the learning within years, courses and units of work.

What do you need to do to get started?

The scope of learning in a school (all the content to be learned and experienced) is usually organised into what we call ‘curriculum organisers’ – e.g. KLAs, or integrated themes.
· Do the ELAs fit into your curriculum organisers?
· Do you need to evaluate your curriculum organisers?

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What do you do next?

Once there is agreement on appropriate curriculum organisers you need to map where the ELAs sit. Examples and templates of different ways to map your curriculum are included in this section. Doing this ensures that the essential content is embedded into your school documents and that all areas of learning sit in the appropriate place in terms of scoping and sequencing learning.
Are the curriculum principles addressed in how you sequence learning?

What will you teach, when will you teach it?

Having established where the ELAs sit the next step is to look at the essential content for each band of development and year group within your school. The reason this work is important is because much learning depends on prior learning e.g. in order to understand a concept in geography or science it may be that some particular numeracy skills are needed. In order for effective learning to occur, this content must be in the right sequence. This involves careful sequencing across KLAs as well as within them.

Schools approach the process of creating a scope and sequence of learning differently depending on the sector, structure and school size.

Where can I find templates and examples of scope and sequences?

Template for Scope and Sequence - Later Adolescence (Word, 177kb)

Template for Scope and Sequence - Primary (Word, 69kb)

Sample of ELA Mapping - ACT Department of Education and Training (Word, 106kb)

Sample of ELA Mapping - Brindabella Christian College (Word, 61kb)

Sample of ELA Mapping - Melba High (Word, 774kb)

Sample of ELA Mapping - O'Connor Cooperative School (Word, 755kb)

Sample of ELA Mapping - Torrens Primary (Word, 60kb)


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